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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2012 :  18:50:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is anyone training at the Northbrook Velodrome early in the morning. I am looking for a fellow bent rider to train with. Thanks.

TTman

Speedbiker
human power expert

USA
2277 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2012 :  19:42:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
On an M1, Mr TTman? Did you see what Mike Mowett just did on his?
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3255 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2012 :  04:22:25  Show Profile  Visit Upright Mike's Homepage  Reply with Quote
John - it's awesome you got an M1 too. The more fast bents on the Velodrome the better! Get that thing hummin on some 28+ mph laps. Should be easy to do at Northbrook. I wish I wasn't about 320 miles away, I'd ride there every chance i could!
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n/a
deleted

2373 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2012 :  10:39:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John,
You are always welcome to ride out in BH with Larry, Warren and I. Byron Gremly's bike is almost finished and he is probably going to do some road rides very soon to get use to his NoCom. Be cool if you can do a Sat or Sun morning road ride.
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sean costin
human power supergeek

Lesotho
1973 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2012 :  20:23:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was at the velodrome tonight. It's kids training night and I sneak in a little workout afterward. Too busy to do mornings at the velodrome right now especially with no showering possible before work.

Sean
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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2012 :  13:23:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all for your responses.
I tried riding the M1 around my block and it was very scary so I stay off the street and just go to the velodrome. I could not control the M1 and drivers did not see me until I put my 900 lumen front strobe on my helmet and flag on the back.

I am learning to ride the M1 using platform pedals. It is quite a bit harder to ride than my Carbent. Low racers use different quadricep muscles and after my first 2 sessions at Northbrook my quads are sore to the touch. It is hard to go straight and and of course very hard to make 90 degree turns since the chain hits the tire if I turn more than an inch (I know you turn by leaning but it takes practice). So there is a big learning curve! I do not know if I will be to safe to race the M1 in the HPV races on July 14!

TTman
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3255 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2012 :  14:24:30  Show Profile  Visit Upright Mike's Homepage  Reply with Quote
John - a very low racer can take a little bit of getting used to too. As an M1 owner myself, my first few times felt a bit different than what I was used to on other bikes. Don't give up!
You're right in that most of your turning is by leaning. At low speeds, most turning will cause the wheel to touch the chain on a lowracer. Once you're rolling more than 10-15 mph you shouldn't have much problems. I can make right and left 90 deg turns on the streets with little problems. My best advice is to just ride out the turns, once you turn just commit to that line and don't swerve the handlebars back and forth too much. The bike will do the rest. It is fast!! Being on a very lowracer means your center of gravity is so much lower. A guy in our club explained to me long ago that its like a trying to balance a short stick standing up on your finger. A longer taller stick (like an upright) is easier to balance, but of course catches more wind.
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warren
human power expert

4664 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  06:09:23  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Byron stopped by LZ's house yesterday and had his first attempt at riding the NoCom we picked up from Garrie earlier his year. LZ built the bike up with components sourced through Earl. LZ had been riding it for the past week or so to make sure it had all the bugs worked out before putting Byron on it. Byron does not ride a recumbent often, and had neven ridden a lowracer. It look him a couple tries but after about 10 minutes he was able to ride up and down the street. We convinced him to do a bike trail ride up to Crystal Lake with us, and other than some issues getting started and a bee sting to the head, he did fine. The bike still needs disk wheels, LZ had the rear Renn wheel all ready to go but after he mounted the tire the rim broke at the seam. I had never seen a rim do that. Byron is sending it back to Renn for repair.

-Warren.
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n/a
deleted

2373 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  09:06:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John.
Very easy to mount lights directly on the bike. I use lights all the time when road riding except at a TT event.
The light brackets are bolted on. The batteries are held in place with velcro. Very easy to remove. Both lights are offensively bright. Later in the year I switch to MagicShine lights which are much brighter.





Edited by - n/a on 07/01/2012 09:09:57
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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  10:51:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Upright Mike

John - a very low racer can take a little bit of getting used to too. As an M1 owner myself, my first few times felt a bit different than what I was used to on other bikes. Don't give up!
You're right in that most of your turning is by leaning. At low speeds, most turning will cause the wheel to touch the chain on a lowracer. Once you're rolling more than 10-15 mph you shouldn't have much problems. I can make right and left 90 deg turns on the streets with little problems. My best advice is to just ride out the turns, once you turn just commit to that line and don't swerve the handlebars back and forth too much. The bike will do the rest. It is fast!! Being on a very lowracer means your center of gravity is so much lower. A guy in our club explained to me long ago that its like a trying to balance a short stick standing up on your finger. A longer taller stick (like an upright) is easier to balance, but of course catches more wind.



Mike,
Thank you. It is good to know that over 10-15 mph turning gets easier.
I will keep at it.

TTman
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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  10:54:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AA

John.
Very easy to mount lights directly on the bike. I use lights all the time when road riding except at a TT event.
The light brackets are bolted on. The batteries are held in place with velcro. Very easy to remove. Both lights are offensively bright. Later in the year I switch to MagicShine lights which are much brighter.








Alan,
Did you drill a hole in the carbon fiber to mount the front light?

Did you ever try a helmet mounted light when riding your NoCom?

TTman
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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  10:58:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by warren

Byron stopped by LZ's house yesterday and had his first attempt at riding the NoCom we picked up from Garrie earlier his year. LZ built the bike up with components sourced through Earl. LZ had been riding it for the past week or so to make sure it had all the bugs worked out before putting Byron on it. Byron does not ride a recumbent often, and had neven ridden a lowracer. It look him a couple tries but after about 10 minutes he was able to ride up and down the street. We convinced him to do a bike trail ride up to Crystal Lake with us, and other than some issues getting started and a bee sting to the head, he did fine. The bike still needs disk wheels, LZ had the rear Renn wheel all ready to go but after he mounted the tire the rim broke at the seam. I had never seen a rim do that. Byron is sending it back to Renn for repair.

-Warren.



Warren,
Good to know. I am able to ride in the velodrome (not fast or steady enough to race) and probably would be ok on a trail. I want to race TTs and as you know those are on roads. So I will have to work on riding on roads.

TTman
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TTman
Starting Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  10:59:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Upright Mike

John - a very low racer can take a little bit of getting used to too. As an M1 owner myself, my first few times felt a bit different than what I was used to on other bikes. Don't give up!
You're right in that most of your turning is by leaning. At low speeds, most turning will cause the wheel to touch the chain on a lowracer. Once you're rolling more than 10-15 mph you shouldn't have much problems. I can make right and left 90 deg turns on the streets with little problems. My best advice is to just ride out the turns, once you turn just commit to that line and don't swerve the handlebars back and forth too much. The bike will do the rest. It is fast!! Being on a very lowracer means your center of gravity is so much lower. A guy in our club explained to me long ago that its like a trying to balance a short stick standing up on your finger. A longer taller stick (like an upright) is easier to balance, but of course catches more wind.



Mike,

Also what class is the M1? Stock like the Carbent?

Thanks.

TTman
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n/a
deleted

2373 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  11:34:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TTman

[quote]

Alan,
Did you drill a hole in the carbon fiber to mount the front light?

Did you ever try a helmet mounted light when riding your NoCom?

TTman



John,
The hole was already drilled in the frame but I used a similar mounting bracket for the M1 I rode a couple years ago. Velcro secured the bracket. No drilling was required. You can probably figure a way to mount lights without drilling. The DiNotte mounting brackets are easy to velcro or bolt on to a frame

I do not use a helmet mounted light as I am not riding at night when its dark.

Edited by - n/a on 07/01/2012 11:35:17
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3255 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2012 :  13:21:22  Show Profile  Visit Upright Mike's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi John, the M1 is considered a stock class bike. I was thinking, do you lean your head over when you turn? I've found that leaning my knee to the inside on turns also helps a bit. You can also sit up a bit to help the turns. I'm not sure what type of seat-pad you have on there, but John usually sticks them down very good with double-sided carpet tape. I made the mistake of stripping it off them, leaving the pad loose, and I felt like I was going to slide off the seat on some turns.

this past week, in the 100 degree weather, I discovered something - riding over a "crap" road with lots of tar patches is not safe when its 100 degrees out. I was going through a 90 degree turn that I've done many many times (when it was cooler), and felt some fishtailing going on. Everything was ok with the bike, but the ROAD was literally moving on me - with big sloppy patches of tar being picked up by car tires and bike tires smeared across the road!
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delcrossv
recumbent enthusiast

Vanuatu
422 Posts

Posted - 07/05/2012 :  08:46:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sean costin

I was at the velodrome tonight. It's kids training night and I sneak in a little workout afterward. Too busy to do mornings at the velodrome right now especially with no showering possible before work.

Sean



Thanks for showing Cecilia drafting- I'm sure she'll get it eventually.;)
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