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 Changes to BSD velo kit...

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
LunaticFringe Posted - 10/22/2010 : 18:30:27
In the pic you can see the changes that I am preparing to do to the Blue Sky Design velomobile kit. It arrived on Wednesday, when I was out of town. They did a GREAT job of packing and shipping the beastie.

There are quite a few large bubbles between the hand laid fiberglass in the tight areas. Most of those are in areas where I will be removing a section of the cockpit to make it more suitable for my commuting needs, building up a reinforcing flange again. The gel-coat is a good quality job. Most folks that would use this fairing in its standard configuration probably wouldn't have issues with the bubbles due to the gel-coat's thickness and strength of the fiberglass in the structural edge.

This fairing is a great value for making your own affordable velomobile. It will be a snap to make the changes that I want... MUCH easier and faster than starting to sculpt and mold from the beginning.

I'll be done with the mods in just a few weeks, and be commuting. I will probably paint it with a US flag theme.

The Flevo velomobile roof that I got from Bluevelo is mighty bitchin'. This is a high quality unit.

Jeff in Tucson


25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/26/2011 : 17:47:24
quote:
Originally posted by Larry Lem

Wait, you were building the velomobile discussed through this entire thread for sale to a customer? <snip>

Larry Lem



Nope. I built it for me. After riding it I discovered that the roads are too jarring without suspension at the faster speeds that I was traveling (plus the fact that I was at about 270 pounds).

I now have a fully suspended Speedster FS that I am adding a fairing to. It can handle my personal weight plus the fairing weight. The roads around my factory are insanely rough as if having been through World War III.

Jeff in Tucson
Larry Lem Posted - 04/13/2011 : 11:53:54
Wait, you were building the velomobile discussed through this entire thread for sale to a customer? With all of the custom work designed to fit you, I thought you were building it for yourself. Or is there more than one vehicle being discussed here?

If this were a project page, I suppose the project summary would be listed at the top.

Larry Lem
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/13/2011 : 11:40:36
The speedo had been yielding a higher speed than actual, but it's still a fast ride.

It's a Catrike 700 that is faster due to improved aerodynamics.

Jeff in Tucson
OpusthePoet Posted - 04/11/2011 : 19:31:37
So, was the mistake optimistic or pessimistic? IOW was the speedo reading low or high?

Opus

My gas is up to $0.99 a burrito, $5.99 for premium and I'm only getting 10 miles to the regular burrito. Dang $0.99 burritos are smaller now.
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/11/2011 : 12:31:50
The Catrike 700 velo is still for sale. Like all other velomobiles, it is larger than a regular bike. The original purchaser did not have a good place for storing it.

I also learned that the speedo was calibrated incorrectly and it has been corrected.

Jeff in Tucson
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/11/2011 : 12:21:37
Coroplast is quite bitchin' and it is how I got started!

Jeff in Tucson
teubner Posted - 04/10/2011 : 10:55:44
Another advantage of coro is that it is flexible, so if your build isn't perfect, you can fudge things a bit.
It is also significantly quieter inside the shell than composites.
But if you are building something that you plan to use for years, don't use any tape or adhesive to hold the coro together.
airmoose Posted - 04/10/2011 : 10:15:35
quote:
Originally posted by TinkerNow you got me thinking I want to build one for my Catrike Road!


If you haven't tried building something like this before, I recommend trying something a little easier (like a tailbox) for your first attempt. You can make it out of coroplast (very cheap and light, and there are numerous web pages devoted to showing you how).

An entire coroplast bodyshell is almost as effective for many riders as a glass shell, although often slightly less visually impressive (although there have been a few stunning examples built). It has the main benefit of extremely light weight, so hill climbing will be affected less than by a heavy glass shell.

One reason I make this suggestion is that many people find that the extra speed that a full body should give you will alter the character of your trike in ways you don't anticipate. The main way involves the serious desire, or need, for suspension. Since a glass body is heavier than a coroplast version, the effects on the trike on rough roads may be even more severe.

At the least, a full coroplast body can give you a taste of a velo and tide you over until your next version is built (after you determine the changes you wish to make). After your second velo, or shell, is built, the original coroplast version can still be used as a loaner or hill climbing version.
Tinker Posted - 04/10/2011 : 05:43:28
I am certainly full-tilt inspired after reading through this thread. Thanks, Jeff, for your diligence in recording and reporting this build. Now you got me thinking I want to build one for my Catrike Road!
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/07/2011 : 21:24:43
I might still do part of ROAM with my new Streetliner, but we'll have to see how it goes with my business. If it is crazy-busy, no can go.

Here is the velo with its new paint job! I leave early Saturday morning to deliver it to Texas. It looks so bitchin'!

Jeff in Tucson

teubner Posted - 04/01/2011 : 10:38:03
quote:
Originally posted by LunaticFringe

The velomobile is currently at the paint shop, being sprayed with a blue color. It will be done by Tuesday/Wednesday. I'll post pics of it next week, then deliver it to its new owner. =)

Jeff in Tucson


Does that mean he is doing the Roll Across America instead of you?
LunaticFringe Posted - 04/01/2011 : 09:01:22
The velomobile is currently at the paint shop, being sprayed with a blue color. It will be done by Tuesday/Wednesday. I'll post pics of it next week, then deliver it to its new owner. =)

Jeff in Tucson
LunaticFringe Posted - 03/06/2011 : 16:34:17
The velomobile now has a new owner! I will now concentrate on my new LunaticFringe fully suspended Streetliner. It's build starts at the end of this month and will be detailed in its own thread.

Jeff in Tucson
LunaticFringe Posted - 02/08/2011 : 07:37:24
I have been having fun, riding the velo to work. My only issue is the last mile near my factory in the industrial park. The road is literally like a battle zone area. At my weight, 265 pounds, I want some suspension. The ride has been greatly improved by lowering the tire pressure in the Marathon Plus tires... but you should see the last mile of road.

This velomobile is now for sale. It will not include the headlight, but its mount accepts any unit that will mount to a handle bar. All that is needed for the new owner is to do some minor bodywork and paint it the color of your choice.

Any takers? $2995 gets it.

Already in the works... the Tucson Streetliner, based upon the HP Velotechnik Speedmachine: http://www.hpvelotechnik.com/produkte/spm/index_e.html br /

Jeff Bales in Tucson, Arizona
monsoon (at) comcast (dot) net
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/26/2011 : 14:18:07
quote:
Originally posted by airmoose

Have you had a chance to ride it at night - at speed - to determine if the lights are good enough? I found that although my lights are fine on lighted city streets, when I get up on River Rd where there are no more street lights, the lights are no longer adequate for safe riding at 30+ mph.

airmoose
Tucson/Marana



I'll actually ride home in the dark for the first time this evening. I'm psyched and ready to rumble. =)

I'll let you know how it goes. My headlight is crazy bright in the industrial park at night. I think that I'll be OK.

Jeff in Tucson
airmoose Posted - 01/26/2011 : 13:07:09
Have you had a chance to ride it at night - at speed - to determine if the lights are good enough? I found that although my lights are fine on lighted city streets, when I get up on River Rd where there are no more street lights, the lights are no longer adequate for safe riding at 30+ mph.

airmoose
Tucson/Marana
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/26/2011 : 07:26:21
I currently have the stock thin wheels on the 700 inside my velo. I have the Marathon Plus on right now. They did improve the ride a LOT over the use of standard tires.

I suspect that my plan to use new wider wheels plus Big Apples will also be an improvement (of course, not to the levels of an active suspension).

I think that you started off with a ride that was already more comfy than where I started. =) I need to get to at least where you are.

I ride to work in the velo again today. I'll leave for my factory in about 45 minutes. Bring on the FUN!!!

Jeff in Tucson
Velocity Velos Posted - 01/25/2011 : 22:09:50
I didn't think the Big Apples helped much, maybe a little. I'm running them on prototype #1 and think I'll go with Marathons the next time I need a set. I ran Primo Comets for LCVMG and liked them (on the track anyway). I might try them on the road one of these days but not until I have 1/2 hour I'm not doing anything else with.

Taylor Wilhour

Velocity Velos
www.velocityvelos.com
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/25/2011 : 11:57:07
Coming soon...

Wider wheels and 'Big Apple' tires.

This thing hauls butt. Now, It need to smooth it out. =)

Jeff in Tucson
OpusthePoet Posted - 01/19/2011 : 19:42:59
I would say that when you lose the weight you will do about the same speed, but you'll get to that speed quicker. When you come down to it top speed is a balance between power and drag, which is only tertiarily affected by weight. Acceleration on the other hand is all about power to weight, with aerodynamic drag only coming into play in the last 1/3 or so of a run. My drag racer is a balance between light weight and low drag for the best possible performance.

Opus

My gas is up to $.99 a burrito, $5.99 for premium and I'm only getting 20 miles to the regular burrito.
25hz Posted - 01/19/2011 : 13:54:16
Man, that's some good speed you're getting there, and that's a lot of weight loss. I ride hard, usually daily, and I'm happy if I can lose a pound a week.
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/19/2011 : 11:17:04
I weighed myself the other day at 268 pounds. Let's see where I end up by summer-time.

Goal: 199 pounds.

I haven't been under 200 pounds since college. In 1997 I lost 52 pounds in 46 days, just by eating a lot of protein and cutting out carbs. Riding the velo should be a healthier way of getting the job done... and should help me to maintain my weight loss.

My heart is still very strong with a low heart rate and my legs are still like tree stumps... I'm going to make the asphalt submit to my whims. Bwah-hah-HAAAAAH!

Jeff in Tucson
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/19/2011 : 11:02:09
OK, this is insane...

I commuted for the first time today, since an impromptu meeting interrupted my effort yesterday.

I was able to easily HAUL ASS across town on Broadway Blvd. Many Tucson drivers use Broadway because it is central in town, going all the way across the city's length, is in good shape, wide, and has lots of business. It also has a super-wide bus/bike lane, much of which has fresh asphalt pavement.

Broadway is mostly flat. I ranged from 27-35 mph across most of the city, if you take out the stop-light time. The speed limit is 40 mph, with most of the cars doing 45-50 mph. For a minute I was going between 45 and 48 mph and still had some gear left on a minor downhill section ( I was wrong about spinning out at 46). During that section of the ride some of the cars were alongside, rather than mostly passing.

It takes a little bit longer to get up to speed than when the velo was just my plain old Catrike 700, but good Lord... the speed keeps building and building.

The cars in the right lane are giving me massive amounts of room. More than I've ever experienced on any other recumbent.

I'm REALLY happy with my commute route and vehicle.

How fast will I go when I lose 60 pounds?! 750 mph?!

Jeff in Tucson
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/17/2011 : 18:32:33
...last video for tonight of the lights from the outside.

Hasta.

Jeff in Tucson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsOHaXVmhP8
LunaticFringe Posted - 01/17/2011 : 18:15:01
Test of my vision at night with new headlight and rear flea blinker.

I use a TriNewt triple LED headlight... I'll run that on the low setting. It is REALLY bright.

Video is shot at night. Not much to look at, but fun for me.

Jeff in Tucson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggMh_blap1I

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